© 2015 by Valley Craft Network.

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I’ve been painting and drawing for as long as I can remember. I sketch objects around me and have always preferred to work from life. Landscapes and still-life vary dramatically from different viewpoints and atmospheric conditions provide endless subject matter.

Wind and weather can create problems for an artist working outside. A canvas becomes a sail in a gust of wind and a palette of wet paint a repository for all kinds of bugs and debris. Once I have the easel and painting surface stabilized with clips and bungee cords, nature begins to enhance the painting process. I have applied paint with reeds, feathers and sticks found at the site. Bits of shell and sand have worked there way into finished paintings. My artwork relies on the combination of experimentation and inspiration. Going out on the coldest days to paint can be invigorating. Foggy and misty conditions can enhance a scene. Working in wet weather often adds “unexpected” texture to the painting surface.

Painting “en plein air” is a challenge, but well worth the effort. Even though the light may change, petals fall or vegetables dull in the time it takes to complete a painting, the slight movements and color variations are inviting to study.

Anne Gibson Snyder ~ Catepetl Art & Frame